3D Printing – Week 1

September 12, 2016 / By

September 12, 2016 / By

Nautilus Shell

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For my first assignment I decided to make an approximation of a Nautilus shell in rhino.  I’ve been looking into recurrent patterns and geometry in nature.  Their shells conform very closely to Phi “The Golden Ratio” so I knew that there must be some way using a curve calculated to phi to generate one. I found a good tutorial here and followed along.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K_p8w96TpJ4

The shell I ended up with is actually that of a Planorbis, a freshwater snail. I thought the shape would make for a more interesting print. I’ll probably model the nautilus shell which is the next step in that series of tutorials and try to print both.

Trying to make this shell introduced me to the capabilities of Rhino. In my opinion it seems like a very powerful program and I’d like to become proficient in it.

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I first made a cube the size of the area we were given to work in.

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I started with a circle, I learned how to use the object snap functions here as they were necessary.

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The diameter of the circles here are to each other 6,3,1.5,1,2,4,8 taking the smallest circle as the base.

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Add concentric circles moving inward on the y plane.

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Trim off the excess sections of each circle to get the curve for the shell.

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Add a sphere at the end of the curve and chop it half.

 

Here I learned the difference between sweep1 and sweep2. Sweep2 uses 2 rails, very handy.

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Then to get the rest of the shell just sweep2 outwards between each circle, using the inside and the outside of the curve as rails.

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and finally the shell

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My takeaways from this exercise were to be precise with measurements and how the math and function system in rhino works. I can imagine complex shapes and prints being relatively easy to make with Rhino. I look forward to using it more.

 

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